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FILE – This August 1997, file photo shows the exterior of the Center for National Security and Arms Control at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, N.M. (AP Photo/Eric Draper, File)

For the second time in a month, strange black circles of smoke have appeared over a neighborhood in southeast Albuquerque near Sandia National Laboratories.

Neighbors in the area also reported on social media that they heard an explosion and some saw orange flames before the rings appeared in the sky shortly after 6 a.m. on Tuesday morning.

Smoke ring in the Albuquerque sky this am. pic.twitter.com/dPy9Dvy6F0

— ✨Valkyrie✨ (@Valerie62205075) November 6, 2018

The same rings were also seen and reported in October. Both times, representatives from Sandia told local media that the oddly cohesive rings were the result of an experimental controlled crude oil burn done at the lab, adding that the experiment was conducted in support of Sandia’s "national security mission."

Research at the lab, which falls under the control of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration, centers around the broad categories of nuclear weapons, defense systems, energy and global security.

Creating the rings doesn’t necessarily require the latest in federal war-fighting technology, however. Here’s a demonstration of a civilian-created smoke ring at Burning Man from ten years ago:

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FILE – This August 1997, file photo shows the exterior of the Center for National Security and Arms Control at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, N.M. (AP Photo/Eric Draper, File)

For the second time in a month, strange black circles of smoke have appeared over a neighborhood in southeast Albuquerque near Sandia National Laboratories.

Neighbors in the area also reported on social media that they heard an explosion and some saw orange flames before the rings appeared in the sky shortly after 6 a.m. on Tuesday morning.

The same rings were also seen and reported in October. Both times, representatives from Sandia told local media that the oddly cohesive rings were the result of an experimental controlled crude oil burn done at the lab, adding that the experiment was conducted in support of Sandia’s “national security mission.”

Research at the lab, which falls under the control of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration, centers around the broad categories of nuclear weapons, defense systems, energy and global security.

Creating the rings doesn’t necessarily require the latest in federal war-fighting technology, however. Here’s a demonstration of a civilian-created smoke ring at Burning Man from ten years ago:

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