[ad_1]

By Richard Cowan

WASHINGTON, Feb 14 (Reuters) – The U.S. Congress on Thursday aimed to end a dispute over border security with legislation that would ignore President Donald Trump’s request for $5.7 billion to help build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border but avoid a partial government shutdown.

Late on Wednesday, negotiators put the finishing touches on legislation to fund the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) through Sept. 30, the end of the fiscal year, along with a range of other federal agencies.

Racing against a Friday midnight deadline, when operating funds expire for the agencies that employ about 800,000 workers at the DHS, the departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Justice and others, the Senate and House of Representatives aimed to pass the legislation later on Thursday.

That would give Trump time to review the measure and sign it into law before temporary funding for about one-quarter of the government expires.

RELATED: Trump visits border wall prototypes amid protests

22 PHOTOS

President Trump visits border wall prototypes amid protests

See Gallery

US President Donald Trump is shown border wall prototypes in San Diego, California on March 13, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

People hold signs during a protest while standing in front of the current border fence and near the prototypes of U.S. President Donald Trump’s border wall, in Tijuana, Mexico March 13, 2018. The sign on the right reads "Trump, walls can be jumped over". REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

US President Donald Trump inspects border wall prototypes in San Diego, California on March 13, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

People attach a sign reading “Trump, stop the mass deportations” to the current border fence and near the prototypes of U.S. President Donald Trump’s border wall, during a protest in Tijuana, Mexico March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

US President Donald Trump’s motorcade arrives at the border fence in San Diego, California on March 13, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

People hold signs reading “No to the wall” and “Trump, put your wall, but in your territory, not in ours”, during a protest near the prototypes of U.S. President Donald Trump’s border wall, seen behind the current border fence, in Tijuana, Mexico March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

US President Donald Trump is shown border wall prototypes with White House Chief of Staff John Kelly (L) in San Diego, California on March 13, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

A man holds a sign reading “Trump, put your wall, but in your territory, not in ours”, during a protest near the prototypes of U.S. President Donald Trump’s border wall, seen behind the current border fence, in Tijuana, Mexico March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

US President Donald Trump arrives to inspect border wall prototypes in San Diego, California on March 13, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

People hold signs reading “No to the wall, Trump,” and “Trump, we are not enemies of the USA” during a protest near the prototypes of U.S. President Donald Trump’s border wall, seen behind the current border fence, in Tijuana, Mexico March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

US President Donald Trump speaks during an inspection of border wall prototypes in San Diego, California on March 13, 2018.
Donald Trump — making his first trip to California as president — warned there would be ‘bedlam’ without the controversial wall he wants to build on the border with Mexico, as he inspected several prototype barriers. The trip to the ‘Golden State’ — the most populous in the country and a Democratic stronghold — was largely upstaged by his own announcement that he had sacked Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.
/ AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexican Federal Police officers stand guard the Mexican side of the Mexico-US border in Tijuana, Baja California state, from where prototypes of the border wall, which US President Donald Trump will inspect on the outskirts of San Diego, in the US, are visible on March 13, 2018.
Fresh off a cabinet reshuffle, President Donald Trump was headed for Democratic stronghold California on Tuesday to inspect prototypes of the controversial border wall with Mexico that was the centerpiece of his White House campaign. / AFP PHOTO / GUILLERMO ARIAS (Photo credit should read GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images)

People hold signs reading “Trump, we will not pay for the wall” and “Trump, stop the mass deportations” near the border fence between Mexico and the U.S., in Tijuana, Mexico March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Journalists gather at a rooftop near the US -Mexico border as President Trump is expected to inspect the border wall prototypes built outskirts San Diego, in Tijuana, Baja California State, Mexico, on March 13, 2018.
Fresh off a cabinet reshuffle, President Donald Trump was headed for Democratic stronghold California on Tuesday to inspect prototypes of the controversial border wall with Mexico that was the centerpiece of his White House campaign. / AFP PHOTO / GUILLERMO ARIAS (Photo credit should read GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. police officers use a ladder to climb up a truck parked in front of the prototypes of U.S. President Donald Trump’s border wall, on the U.S. side of the current border fence, in Tijuana, Mexico March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Jorge Duenes

An agent faces Mexico while standing by the vehicle of U.S. President Donald Trump at the border near San Diego, California, where Trump reviewed wall prototypes designed to serve as a protective barrier against illegal immigrants, drugs and smuggled weapons, March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

A U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Border Patrol Agent sits on horseback near U.S. President Donald Trump’s motorcade during a tour of U.S.-Mexico border wall prototypes near the Otay Mesa Port of Entry in San Diego, California. U.S., March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

TIJUANA, MEXICO – MARCH 13:Anti-Trump protestors demonstrate on the Mexico side of the border before the arrival of the U.S. President to inspect the prototypes of the proposed border wall on March 13, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. (Photo by Wally Skalij/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

The motorcade carrying US President Donald Trump drives past a US-Mexico border fence as Trump head for an inspection of border wall prototypes in San Diego, California on March 13, 2018.
Donald Trump — making his first trip to California as president — warned there would be ‘bedlam’ without the controversial wall he wants to build on the border with Mexico, as he inspected several prototype barriers. The trip to the ‘Golden State’ — the most populous in the country and a Democratic stronghold — was largely upstaged by his own announcement that he had sacked Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.
/ AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Mounted Border Patrol agents are seen as US President Donald Trump inspects border wall prototypes in San Diego, California on March 13, 2018.
Donald Trump — making his first trip to California as president — warned there would be ‘bedlam’ without the controversial wall he wants to build on the border with Mexico, as he inspected several prototype barriers. The trip to the ‘Golden State’ — the most populous in the country and a Democratic stronghold — was largely upstaged by his own announcement that he had sacked Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.
/ AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

US President Donald Trump inspects border wall prototypes in San Diego, California on March 13, 2018.
Donald Trump — making his first trip to California as president — warned there would be ‘bedlam’ without the controversial wall he wants to build on the border with Mexico, as he inspected several prototype barriers. The trip to the ‘Golden State’ — the most populous in the country and a Democratic stronghold — was largely upstaged by his own announcement that he had sacked Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.
/ AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

US President Donald Trump holds up a poster of before and after photos of a segment of the border wall prototypes with Chief Patrol Agent Rodney S. Scott (R) in San Diego, California on March 13, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)




HIDE CAPTION

SHOW CAPTION

of


SEE ALL


BACK TO SLIDE

Failure to do so would shutter many government programs, from national parks maintenance and air traffic controller training programs to the collection and publication of important data for financial markets, for the second time this year.

“This agreement denies funding for President Trump’s border wall and includes several key measures to make our immigration system more humane,” House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita Lowey, a Democrat, said in a statement.

According to congressional aides, the final version of legislation would give the Trump administration $1.37 billion in new money to help build 55 miles (88.5 km) of new physical barriers on the southwest border, far less than what Trump had been demanding.

It is the same level of funding Congress appropriated for border security measures last year, including barriers but not concrete walls.

Since he ran for office in 2016, Trump has been demanding billions of dollars to build a wall on the southwest border, saying “crisis” conditions required a quick response to stop the flow of illegal drugs and undocumented immigrants, largely from Central America.

He originally said Mexico would pay for a 2,000-mile (3,200-km) concrete wall – an idea that Mexico dismissed.

34 PHOTOS

Various types of homes, lifestyles in shadow of the border fence

See Gallery

A shoe and clothes pins are seen on a clothes line next to a section of the border fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, March 3, 3017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Tourists take pictures next to the fence separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, February 24, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Mexican Carlos, 27, who says that he was deported from the United States, heats up tortillas at his house near the double fence that separates Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, March 3, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Pensioner Pedro, 72, rests outside his home near a section of the fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, February 21, 2017. “Neither Trump nor the wall is going to stop anyone, maybe just for a moment,” he said. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Pants hang on a section of the fence separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, March 3, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

A man is fishing next to the fence separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, February 24, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Mexican carpenter Porfirio, 68, stands near a section of the fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, February 23, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Joaquin, 36, a chef from Guatemala who says he was deported from the United States, builds a bed in a tree, near a section of the border fence separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, February 26, 2017. “I’ve tried to cross so many times that the (U.S.) border guards even got to know me, but I never made it back,” said Joaquin, who makes a living by collecting trash in Tijuana that he tries to sell to a local recycling plant. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Joaquin, 36, a chef from Guatemala who says he was deported from the United States, poses for a photograph while leaning on a section of the border fence separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, February 26, 2017. “I’ve tried to cross so many times that the (U.S.) border guards even got to know me, but I never made it back,” said Joaquin, who makes a living by collecting trash in Tijuana that he tries to sell to a local recycling plant. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

A man sells hot dogs next to the fence separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, February 24, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Mexican carpenter Porfirio, 68, cuts his son’s hair outside their home near the border fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, February 21, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Pensioner Pedro, 72, is seen at his house near a section of the fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, February 26, 2017. “Neither Trump nor the wall is going to stop anyone, maybe just for a moment,” he said. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Pensioner Pedro, 72, caresses his dog Orejona outside his home near a section of the fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, February 23, 2017. “Neither Trump nor the wall is going to stop anyone, maybe just for a moment,” he said. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

A shopping cart with a typical Mexican hat and a broom are seen next to the fence separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, February 28, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

A member of the U.S. border patrol inspects the area where the border fence separating Mexico and the United States is interrupted, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, February 21, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

The border fence separating Mexico and the United States is seen through a hole of a second border fence in an area where double border fences were built, in Tijuana, Mexico, February 28, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

A family burns trash near a section of the border fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, February 23, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

A girl runs outside her home near a section of the fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, March 3, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Mexican architect Carlos Torres, 68, adjusts signs near the double border fences separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, February 25, 2017. “Walls won’t halt immigration,” Torres said. Trump, he said, “doesn’t know what he’s talking about. Here at this fence, people keep crossing every week.” REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

A girl climbs stairs near a section of the fence separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, February 20, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Carpenter Moses and dental assistant Sara’s home stands near a section of the fence separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, March 5, 2017. “Trump is a good actor, a racist and is ignorant of God and people. Kennedy said, we are brothers and no walls are needed,” Sara said. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Mexican architect Carlos Torres, 68, is reflected in a glass window of his house near a section of the double border fences separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, March 1, 2017. “Walls won’t halt immigration,” Torres said. Trump, he said, “doesn’t know what he’s talking about. Here at this fence, people keep crossing every week.” REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Pilar, 27, a housewife, cleans her house near a section of the fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, March 3, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

A house stands near a section of the fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, February 21, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

A shack stands next to a section of the border fence separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, February 20, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Joaquin, 36, a chef from Guatemala who says he was deported from the United States, sits underneath a tree near a section of the border fence separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, February 28, 2017. “I’ve tried to cross so many times that the (U.S.) border guards even got to know me, but I never made it back,” said Joaquin, who makes a living by collecting trash in Tijuana that he tries to sell to a local recycling plant. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

A section of the border fence separating Mexico (L) and the United States is seen on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, February 21, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

The Mexican neighborhood Nido de Aguilas is seen next to the border fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, March 2, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

A painting of Jesus Christ is seen on the wall of a house, next to a section of the border fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, March 3, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

A house stands next to a section of the border fence separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, February 28, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

A section of the fence separating Mexico and the United States is seen, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, February 22, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

An officer of the U.S. border patrol inspects the area where the border fence separating Mexico and the United States is interrupted, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, February 23, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

Mexican engineer Enrique, 65, walks around a basketball court at his house, next to the border fence that separates Mexico and the United States and which also serves as the fence for his house, in Tijuana, Mexico, February 28, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.

The roof of a house made with an advertisement banner is seen next to a section of the border fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico, February 21, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH “FENCE GARRIDO” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES.




HIDE CAPTION

SHOW CAPTION

of


SEE ALL


BACK TO SLIDE

Trump has not yet said whether he would sign the legislation into law if the Democratic-controlled House of Representatives and Republican-led Senate approve it, even as many of his fellow Republicans in Congress were urging him to do so.

Instead, he said on Wednesday he would hold off on a decision until he examines the final version of legislation.

But Trump, widely blamed for a five-week shutdown that ended in January, said he did not want to see federal agencies close again because of fighting over funds for the wall.

Senator Richard Shelby, the Republican negotiator who is chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, said in a Twitter post he spoke to Trump later on Wednesday and he was in good spirits. Shelby told Trump the agreement was “a downpayment on his border wall.”

‘NATIONAL EMERGENCY’

Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, who is in regular contact with the White House, said Trump was “inclined to take the deal and move on.”

But Graham also told reporters that Trump would then look elsewhere to find more money to build a border wall and was “very inclined” to declare a national emergency to secure the funds for the project.

Such a move likely would spark a court battle, as it is Congress and not the president that mainly decides how federal funds get spent. Several leading Republicans have cautioned Trump against taking the unilateral action.

Under the bill, the government could hire 75 new immigrant judge teams to help reduce a huge backlog in cases and hundreds of additional border patrol agents.

Hoping to reduce violence and economic distress in Central America that fuels immigrant asylum cases in the United States, the bill also provides $527 million to continue humanitarian assistance to those countries.

The House Appropriations Committee said the bill would set a path for reducing immigrant detention beds to about 40,520 by the end of the fiscal year, down from a current count of approximately 49,060.

Democrats sought reductions, arguing that would force federal agents to focus on apprehending violent criminals and repeat offenders and discourage arrests of undocumented immigrants for minor traffic violations, for example.

17 PHOTOS

Migrants trekking to the United States rely on faith

See Gallery

Pastor Jose Murcia, 47, preaches to migrants, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America traveling to the U.S., outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018.

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Nicolas Alonso Sanchez, 47, from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., poses for a picture as he holds a cross at a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018. "God helped me and gave me the strength, helped me to make my dreams come true. God gave me all the strength to get all the way here," Sanchez said. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Migrants, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America traveling to the U.S., pray before food distribution outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico December 1, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Juan Francisco, 25, from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., shows his tattoo of the 23rd Psalm of the Book of Psalms as he poses for a picture outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 26, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Victor Alfonso, 29, from Guatemala, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., poses for a picture as he wears charms depicting the Virgin of Guadalupe at a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 26, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

David Amador, 25, from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., poses for a picture as he holds a cross at a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 28, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Migrants, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America traveling to the U.S., raise their hands while praying before moving by buses to a new shelter, in Tijuana, Mexico November 30, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

A migrant, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America traveling to the U.S., is wrapped with a banner depicting the Virgin of Guadalupe in front of a riot police cordon, as migrants try to reach the border wall between the U.S. and Mexico in Tijuana, Mexico November 25, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Herso, 17, from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., poses for a picture as he wears a t-shirt depicting the Virgin of Guadalupe outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018.

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

A booklet of Psalm 119:105 is left on a self-made tent at a temporary shelter of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., in Tijuana, Mexico November 27, 2018.

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Migrants, part of a caravan from El Salvador traveling to the U.S., pray as they are blocked by the Mexican police during an operation to detain them for entering the country illegally, in Metapa, Mexico November 21, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Migrants, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America traveling to the U.S., raise their hands as they listen to the preaching of pastor Jose Murcia (not pictured) outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

A migrant, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America traveling to the U.S., sleeps with a book in Spanish "What does the Bible teach us?" in a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

A writing "Jesus Christ is the Lord" is seen on a car window outside a temporary shelter for a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Elmer, 29, from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., poses for a picture as he holds an icon depicting Jesus Christ and the Virgin of Guadalupe while lining up for food distribution outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Juan Francisco, 25, from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., shows his tattoo reading "I can do everything with Christ who strengthens me" as he poses for a picture outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 26, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

An image of the Virgin of Guadalupe is seen in a tent of migrants part of a caravan of thousands from Central America trying to reach the United States, on a street in Tijuana, Mexico, December 15, 2018.

(REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins)




HIDE CAPTION

SHOW CAPTION

of


SEE ALL


BACK TO SLIDE

The Senate Appropriations Committee, which is run by Republicans, said there were provisions in the bill that could result in an increase in detention beds from last year.

Lowey said the bill would improve medical care and housing of immigrant families in detention and expand a program providing alternatives to detention.

The wide-ranging bill also contains some important domestic initiatives, including a $1.2 billion increase in infrastructure investments for roads, bridges and other ground transport, as well as more for port improvements.

With the 2020 decennial census nearing, the bill provides a $1 billion increase for the nationwide count. Also, federal workers, battered by the record 35-day partial government shutdown that began on Dec. 22 as Trump held out for wall funding, would get a 1.9 percent pay increase if the bill becomes law.

(Reporting by Richard Cowan Editing by Robert Birsel and Chizu Nomiyama)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

[ad_2]

Source link

Load More By admin
Load More In Security

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Check Also

IPhone owners can sue Apple for monopolizing App Store, Supreme Court rules – CNN

[ad_1] Justice Brett Kavanaugh, in the majority opinion, said that when “retailers e…